Going to Japan with Shizune

Shizune is a DIY emo-violence band from Lonigo, Italy. In December 2015 they had the chance to play 9 shows in Japan. Here’s the story in their own words…

Going to play in Japan was an awesome surprise and a great opportunity for us that developed in a real do-it-yourself way – no booking involved, just DIY passion, friendship and hard work for all the organizers.

One day, the mighty Hiro-san, drummer for Infro, with whom we released a nice split album, wrote a message to our singer asking “Would you like to play in Japan?

– ”Fuck yes! Why not?” was our answer.

After a couple of months, Hiro wrote us back:

– “Book your tickets; you’re going to play nine gigs in Japan.”

We arrived in Tokyo on 17 December 2015. Jet lagged as hell we met Sho, a really great guy who helped us organize the tour and who’s playing in the awesome band Blue Friend.

The first night, as expected, we went out for some (many) drinks. We met other dudes from the DIY scene of Tokyo, great people who really care about it all.

Playing the first show in Tokyo at the Nine Spice was amazing: the venue was cool and the audience was really passionate. There were guys singing along, even songs in Italian. That was a blast.

Every venue was unique. The passion of the organizers was incredible. We played in clubs, like NINE SPICE and WARP in Tokyo, the GATTACA in Kyoto, the PEPPERLAND in Okayama, at a festival in an awesome squat-like venue, the legendary Hokage in Osaka, in a small DIY records shop (Impulse Records) in Takamatsu called TOO NICE, in a huge rehearsal centre in Nagoya and in a very cool bar, the MEGAHERTZ in Kokura, Kita-Kyushu, the Western Japanese island (we’ve been told that the last foreign band that played at Megahertz was Daïtro from France).

We travelled around 3 islands of Japan for around 3000 km, slept in many crazy different places, from a living room of an old japanese-style house to a ghost haunted hotel to a manga kissaten (meaning a manga cafè). We played Pachinko, 90’s coin up in 3 floors video games center, we took Purikura and enjoyed the fantastic Japanese cooking.

Every night we met new people with whom we had the best time. We could share with them our experiences on every different aspect of this crazy thing called DIY scene. We exchanged impressions on how different and beautiful it was there and we talked a lot about our lives in Italy. We even had the chance to discuss Japanese and European politics, like the re-organization of the Japanese Army and the refugees “crisis” in Europe.

Besides Tokyo and Osaka, we met really few people who could speak English. Fortunately, we have 2 Japanese speaking people in Shizune, so we were able to manage each and every situation! Since people were showing a big interest in us and wanted to ask many things, we were able to communicate, interact with the crowd and joke around!

Nothing would have happened without the help of awesome people like Hiro, Sho, Ikawa, Naoto, Kenji and Akira. We had all the possible support and help from them.

The bands we played with were amazing; all bands were passionate and ultra-focused; their commitment to music really impressed us.

(Infro / Blu Friend / Forget Me Not / Cyberne / Flesco / Kain / SlydingMan / Asthenia / Nengu / NOTIIBELIKESOMEONE / Segwei / Vacant / Dead Pudding / Alt of the Society / QuiQui / Ilil / Kmkms / As If To Imply / Matou / Look at the moment / Aoitori / Universe Last a Ward / Sans Visage / sassya / Shut your Mouth / Storm of Void / Terrible Joke / Scrotal Vice / Palm / Scottish Fold / ACBOY / WDLK / Narr / The Noup / Hue / Friendship / Rebel One Excalibur / Sequence / By the end of Summer / Voodolian Trio / Nuff / VNR and more)

What else? Daijyoubu!

DIY Conspiracy

The (International) DIY Conspiracy is the unbroken spirit of the anti-authoritarian and Do-It-Yourself punk culture. The website is an online tool for exchanging information—news, media, columns, analysis, interviews, reviews, archives—about underground culture and radical ideas. Contact the DIY Conspiracy HQ at: diyconspiracy@riseup.net